Does scanning your negatives negate the film option you took?

I’m using film and I’m scanning it!

I admit the crime, I’m not a pure film user, wet printing for hours in his dark room, never seeing the light of day, like a vampire…… STOP!

That’s crazy. Film is beautiful! Film cameras feel right in my hand! Developing film is fun! But a lot of people can’t go the whole way!

I do not have the room to build a real dark room.

I do not have the time to make test strips, dodge, burn and after half of one night produce ONE print. Admitted, the print will be beautiful, gorgeous. 
But It’s simply not possible. I’m thinking of doing it, dreaming of it, but it’s not (yet) possible.

I have to accept the second best: I shoot film and I scan the negatives or slides.

It’s not the real thing, but to my defense I can say that I print quite a lot of my photos. They don’t live only on my computer!

I don’t feel guilty of doing this. It’s simply the way I work, the way I am able to do what I like to do.

My scanner is not really to notch, it’s a lowly flatbed scanner that won’t get all the details and dynamic range out of my negatives and certainly not out of my slides. I chose it becaiuse it allows me to scan 12 negatives in one go.   I tried an Opticfilm 8200, but I needed hours to scan one by one the images of a whole film of 36 exposures (39 with the Olympus XA2). The quality was better, but it took too long.

If I need the full resolution from some great shots, I’ll have it printed by a lab, framed and nailed to the wall.

That’s the way I work and I like it.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Does scanning your negatives negate the film option you took?

  1. Nice statement!
    Actually grabbed a used Leica M6 to take my filmphotography seriously 🙂
    Are the scanning-results in this post from the epson v600-scanner? They look pretty good 🙂
    Thinking about buying this one too.
    Greetings

    Like

    • Hi and thanks for your comment.

      These scans are from an elderly Nikon Coolscan IV – unfortunately I had to sell it because of financial questions…. The scan quality was VERY good though but if it breaks down, it’s dead. Nikon won’t be able to repair it.

      The Epson V600 scans are noticeably inferior, but with some sharpening and Lightroom work the results are still OK. The Canoscan 9000F MkII is even better, and cheaper!

      As I said, I would rank the scanners I used like this:

      1) Coolscan IV
      2) Opticview 8100
      3) Canoscan 9000F MkII
      4) Epson V600

      Like

  2. Hi and thanks for your comment.

    These scans are from an elderly Nikon Coolscan IV – unfortunately I had to sell it because of financial questions…. The scan quality was VERY good though but if it breaks down, it’s dead. Nikon won’t be able to repair it.

    The Epson V600 scans are noticeably inferior, but with some sharpening and Lightroom work the results are still OK. The Canoscan 9000F MkII is even better, and cheaper!

    As I said, I would rank the scanners I used like this:

    1) Coolscan IV
    2) Opticview 8100
    3) Canoscan 9000F MkII
    4) Epson V600

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s